Core team:


Charles Goodnight

University of Vermont

Department of Biology, Professor

He studies genetic differentiation and evolution in structured populations. His research combines theoretical and experimental approaches to study the effects of selection among individuals, populations and communities. One of his major areas of interest is how certain types of genetic variation, such as epistatic interactions among loci, can contribute to a response to selection in a subdivided population even though they cannot contribute to a response to selection in a large panmictic population.


Most recent papers:

Charles Goodnight, Jonathan N. Pruitt, Susan E. Riechert. Intense group selection selects for ideal group compositions, but selection within groups maintains them. Animal Behaviour, 15-24, 124, 2017.
[pdf]
Charles Goodnight. On the effectiveness of multilevel selection. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, , 39, 2016.
[pdf]
Charles Goodnight, Joshua L. Payne, Margaret (Maggie) Eppstein. Underdominance, Multiscale Interactions, and Self-Organizing Barriers to Gene Flow. Journal of Artificial Evolution and Applications, 13, 2009, 2009.
[pdf] [journal page]
Charles Goodnight, Joshua L. Payne, Margaret (Maggie) Eppstein. Sensitivity of Self-Organized Speciation to Long Distance Dispersal. 2007 IEEE Symposium on Artificial Life , , , 2007.
[pdf] [journal page]
Charles Goodnight, Joshua L. Payne, Margaret (Maggie) Eppstein. Speciation by Self-Organizing Barriers to Gene Flow in Simulated Populations with Localized Mating. 2006.
[pdf] [journal page]

Most recent press:

Science Daily
2014-10-01